Cruisin’ the Milestones: ‘From the Summit to the Sea’ Rides Into Morro Bay Oct. 23rd

“From the Summit to the Sea” vintage-car caravan, Oct. 22-23, crosses the imaginary finish line in Morro Bay, but it all begins in Yosemite National Park, which is celebrating its 150th anniversary, and in Sacramento, where California State Parks is celebrating its 150th anniversary with the founding of Yosemite, the first State Park.

By ED OCHS

From the Summit to the Sea“From the Summit to the Sea” vintage-car caravan, Oct. 22-23, crosses the imaginary finish line in Morro Bay, but it all begins in Yosemite National Park, which is celebrating its 150th anniversary, and in Sacramento, where California State Parks is celebrating its 150th anniversary with the founding of Yosemite, the first State Park.

The 150th anniversary of the Yosemite Grant is a major benchmark, a big deal, and they’ve been getting ready for it for almost three years.

“We’ve been working with the National Park Service since January 2012 in preparation for the 150th anniversary year of the Yosemite Grant Act,” said Rhonda Salisbury, CEO, Yosemite Sierra Visitors Bureau in Oakhurst, Calif.

“This has been a huge collaborative effort between all four Yosemite gateway communities, California State Parks, National Park Service, Yosemite Conservancy and more,” Miss Salisbury said. “There are hundreds of events that have taken place or a still planned for the 150th anniversary beginning in September 2013 and continuing until December 31, 2014.

“The biggest events in our gateway—the south entrance, Highway 41—has been our Inaugural Yosemite Festival celebrating all that is Yosemite through art, history and education. This festival will continue to honor and bring awareness to Yosemite. Artists from all over Madera County displayed their Yosemite-themed art. Mono and Chukchansi tribes both were represented with booths about their culture.

“The south gate has had many ongoing events as well—the Sequoiascape Exhibit at the Fresno Yosemite International Airport, Yosemite ‘Rocks’ Artistic Learning series, Lure & Lore of Yosemite Exhibit at the Yosemite Sierra Visitors Bureau in Oakhurst, ‘Tony Krizan—Yosemite’s Forgotten Trails’ hiking series, and more. We’ve had our local brewery, South Gate Brewing Company release a special 1864 Ale in October 2013 in honor of the anniversary. Two local wineries also bottled special labels and blends in honor of the Yosemite Grant.

“Sierra Art Trails, in October 2013, dedicated their open studio tour with over 100 artists of every medium to the Yosemite Grant and featured their artist tributes to Yosemite,” Miss Salisbury said.

Yosemite to Morro Bay

Summit to Sea logoWhen dozens of vintage-vehicle drivers start their engines on the morning of the 23rd in Yosemite they’ll find themselves at the summit of their journey headed for the sea, surrounded by arguably the most spectacular collection of scenery in America.

Said Miss Salisbury, “Just out of Oakhurst you’ll drive through the Sierra National Forest, see the Merced River run through the historic town of Wawona, witness the amazing cliffs and vistas along the road to Yosemite Valley and enter into the iconic world of Yosemite when you come out of the tunnel and see Tunnel View’s—one of the most photographed vistas in the World—the artwork of Bridalveil Fall, El Capitan, Half Dome and many more Yosemite landmarks. October offers an array of fall colors that will follow you along your journey.

“‘From the Summit to the Sea’ will bring the car enthusiasts back into Yosemite to remind them that there is so much to see and do. We are very excited for them to come in the ‘off season’ and see the beautiful fall colors.”

This panoramic event will certainly do its part to promote Yosemite tourism—an estimated 3.5 million visitors are expected this year—but it will do wonders to promote little Morro Bay, a proto 20th-century California fishing-village edging gingerly into the 21st century. In addition to being a naturalist’s seaside paradise, Morro Bay also happens to be a biking/kayaking/boating escape on some of the most dazzling, estuarine coastline and marine-life-rich ocean this side of Maui.

Compared to venerable Yosemite though, Morro Bay, 50 years a city, is the new kid on the block. Loosely midway between the Bay Area and L.A., off key Highways 1 and 101, Morro Bay is in a good spot for a lot of things that come down the highway these days.

“Morro Bay is ideally located for those classic car and motorcycle trips up the coast,” said Morro Bay’s Mayor, Jamie Irons. “This event takes advantage of a classic trip from the mountains to the sea, which is another amazing thing California has to offer, with Morro Bay being the finish line for that classic trip.

“The 50th celebration has been a full year and a lot of credit and recognition needs to go to the Morro Bay 50th Committee for working so hard to put it all together,” Mayor Irons said. “‘Summit to Sea’ is very cool and it’s always great to form partnerships. I’m happy to have two pinnacles be connected and promoted this way.”

When “Summit to Sea” participants conclude their journey at 565-foot-high Morro Rock  around sunset on that sparkling October day they’ll experience another classic race that’s unbeatable—sunset on the Pacific—and a warm reception in Morro Bay.

“October is one of Morro Bay’s most beautiful seasons,” said the Mayor. “I hope that the participants are greeted with October’s crisp, clear days, where the temperature has a subtle drop creating that clear horizon full of spectacular color as the sun is setting.”

Connecting the pinnacles

“From the Summit to the Sea” is the brainchild of Karin Moss of Moss Marketing Group, based in Morro Bay. Miss Moss attended some of the early planning meetings of Morro Bay’s 50th Anniversary Committee during her tenure as Director of Tourism in Morro Bay and shared some of her ideas and experiences with legacy events.

Miss Moss, who honed her marketing and promotional skills in the upper echelons of the music business, had previously been on the steering committee of the 25th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge, 75th anniversary of the Blue Ridge Parkway, and recently produced the 10th anniversary of the death of Dale Earnhardt in conjunction with the opening of the NASCAR Hall of Fame.

To reach the broadest possible audience for “From the Summit to the Sea,” Miss Moss suggested partnering with California State Parks, with whom she had a previous relationship in the late ’90s when she was Executive Director of the California Sesquicentennial Foundation.

“Not only were they enthusiastic about partnering with Morro Bay but they appointed me to their statewide event committee,” Miss Moss said.

“I later realized that it was also the 150th Anniversary of Yosemite, and envisioned that creating an event linking Morro Bay to Yosemite via Highway 41 would resonate with the over 5 million tourists and visitors to the Yosemite website. It seemed like a natural partnership, and the theme ‘From the Summit to the Sea’ was launched.”

It wasn’t terribly hard getting the partners involved, she said, “because every one of them saw the vision from the beginning and wanted to be involved…

“I envision participants would have the same spirit of adventure that I do and could embrace this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Just the other day a woman registered from Pasadena and when I asked her how she found out about it she said, ‘at the beauty shop.’ I’m thrilled to know that our message is getting out there.”

Early on Moss saw the stars aligning for “From the Summit to the Sea,” because it’s all about California at its best, the California of classic cars, endless summers, rock music, surfing, beaches and grand State Parks.

“This partnership just seems like a natural one to promote Morro Bay, State Parks and Yosemite,” Miss Moss said, “and I feel confident that others will feel the same way by participating or, at the very least, joining us at sunset at The Rock on October 23 to welcome the many car aficionados and be part of the welcoming festivities.”

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Sources and Resources:

Official Yosemite Grant 150th Anniversary website: http://www.nps.gov/yose/anniversary.

“From the Summit to the Sea” website: http://www.fromthesummittothesea.com

Official California State Park 150th Anniversary website: http://www.150.parks.ca.gov

Morro Bay 50th Anniversary: http://morrobay50th.com/


A Visitor’s Guide to Preserving Yosemite

What park visitors need to know that will help maintain and sustain the health and well-being of the park for visitors into the future.

  • Leave nothing but footprints, take nothing but pictures (not including the wonderful souvenirs you can buy in the gift shops).
  • Be aware of animals. Speeding kills bears, and feeding animals is not healthy for the animal (or you).
  • Teach your children about wilderness—the beauty and danger. Follow rules and read signs–they are for your protection and Yosemite’s preservation.
  • Talk to the rangers. They are a wealth of knowledge and can find answers to almost any question!
  • Read the Yosemite Guide handed out at the park entrance and see the exhibits. There is so much history and important sustainability information. The more you know the better your vacation will be and the healthier the park will be.

(Source: Yosemite Sierra Visitors Bureau)

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Marketing Ace Karin Moss Finds Fertile Ground for Success in Morro Bay

Talkin’ Morro Bay, marketing, tourism and the road ahead with former TBID executive director, veteran special events promoter and dealmaker, Karin Moss.

Karin Moss
Karin Moss knows how to laugh.

Karin Moss has lived in California for the past 35 years, but she had never been to Morro Bay before she interviewed and was hired as Executive Director of the Morro Bay Tourism Bureau in late 2012.

Before taking the job and moving to Morro Bay, she had been the National Director of Promotion for Indian Motorcycle in Gilroy when they abruptly went bankrupt. The new owners recruited her to “a little one-horse town” outside of Charlotte. Within a year they sold the company on the verge of bankruptcy, and Moss had to shift gears. Fortunately for her, she’s good at that.

“I became the director of tourism for 10 counties in the Blue Ridge Mountains,” she said, “but I always wanted to come back to California.”

From across the country she was looking at various industry job sites when she saw the Morro Bay listing on the Western Association of Convention & Visitor Bureaus site out of Sacramento.

“I knew where it was located, but until I came for the interview, I was Googling and MapQuesting,” she confessed. “I had never really been to Morro Bay before the initial interview.

“I’ve had a really big, lengthy career,” Moss said. “I thought this would be a great place to be, and that was really the motivation for me. I’ve done the big-city thing, I’ve done L.A., Chicago, New York, San Francisco. My idea of really living well is to do urban business in a rural setting, and that’s really what I was signing up for.”

Opening the new Visitors Center

Moss was hired in November 2012 and relocated to Morro Bay, courtesy of the city. It was an amazing return to California for Moss. It demonstrated her skill and her will. But the reality was she was starting with nothing and had to hit the tarmac running.

“I flew into town and started the job the first week of December 2012, and put together the whole Visitors Center.

“I think they were looking for someone that had experience with start-ups, and I had a lot of experience with start-ups,” she said. “What you would be looking for in a start-up executive director and what you would be looking for in an executive director several years later are two different things,” she said, paving the way for what would follow.

It’s hardly unusual to find out what a new job is really like only after being hired, never before. What Moss didn’t know before she was hired was that she had parachuted into a turf war between the Chamber of Commerce and Tourism Bureau over the Visitors Center, and TBID won. Enter Moss to a chill in the air and a lot of money at stake.

“Some were not wanting to support this new woman from the Blue Ridge,” she laughed, “so it was really great to meet people and get them to roll up their sleeves and help me get that thing open.

She was tasked with having the Visitors Center open by January 2,2013. She had to move everything out of the former Chamber office, furnish the new place, get internet and phones going, hire the people—and she rolled it out by January 2nd. “I think that’s why they needed a seasoned executive director, to get it done, somebody who wouldn’t have to think twice about it,” she said.

Right from the beginning Moss took the marketing in-house, eliminating a countywide ad agency, associated retainers and mark-up charges.

“That was what I was tasked to do, which was market Morro Bay tourism. So I took everything in-house.  It was an excellent decision, absolutely. It was a money-saving decision, and it enabled us to turn on a dime. There were no mark-up charges. I did advertising, promotion, social media, publicity, media relations, public relations.”

Moss left the job in early April, a new executive director has since been hired, and Moss admits feeling some sense of relief stepping away from the high-visibility, labor-intensive position.

At the same time she was leaving, it was announced that Morro Bay tourism was up 33%. More visitors were staying overnight in Morro Bay’s hotels and motels.

“I delivered the end product,” Moss said. “I don’t think anyone would deny that. But I’m a very independent person. I like to work when I want to work, I like to have lots of different clients, I like to volunteer, I like to travel.

“What they needed in the first place to jump-start this organization and what they need now are two different things, so it really has nothing to do with me or where they’re going in the future.

“I was very satisfied with my delivery on that job. I’ve met a lot of people I really like. I’ve developed some collaboration in the community and overcame a lot of the negativity over the separation of the Visitors Center from the Chamber. I worked closely with the Chamber, I was part of their committees, I helped them market events in a very positive way. So it was a good marriage. But I’ve had a big career and I want to continue having a big career.”

The numbers suggest Moss, TBID and the city did something right in 2013, and before. “A lot of people have been planting seeds for a long time, and a lot of money’s been spent,” she said. “It’s not like a non-profit organization where we’re standing on the street handing out fliers. We’ve bought a lot of media, we’ve had some great agencies, some great creative. They had the local promotions committee here. A lot has been done over the last five years, so yes it’s convenient for me that as I’m leaving the numbers are looking good, and I do take some of the credit, but I certainly can’t take all of the credit.”

Moss was still saying “we” almost two weeks after exiting TBID, which is understandable. Marketing Morro Bay was, still is and will continue to be fresh on her mind.

Why Morro Bay?

“There’s so many ways to market Morro Bay. You can’t just look at tourism marketing,” she said. “Everything is everything: you have look at what’s happening with the merchants, how clean is the community, what’s happening with the restaurants. Just because you slept on a $1,500 mattress, if you have a bad breakfast, or there’s garbage on the street, or bad customer service, your entire experience was not a good experience. I like to view marketing globally.

“In my career I’ve been a single woman on the road a lot. I would even go to places that weren’t that great if they treated me well, if I knew they had a clean bathroom, if the grilled cheese sandwich was served by a nice lady.

“In the case of Morro Bay we’re marketing a lot of different demographics, but fortunately we have substantial enough budget that we can reach those people.”

Though Moss isn’t directing the show anymore, she’s still very much in the game.

“I’ll always be promoting Morro Bay,” she said. “We all are, aren’t we?”

One of the last things she did with the Bureau was run a big promotion in the Central Valley where she gave away an all-expense-paid weekend in Morro Bay.

“People went crazy over getting a weekend trip in Morro Bay. I literally spoke to a thousand people; not one single person had a negative thing to say about Morro Bay. Usually you’ve got to listen to the bad dinner, the bad whatever, the horrible sheets, but everybody had a good feeling about it.

“But the call to action, the unique selling proposition: Why Morro Bay… Why not Pismo, why not Cayucos? There’s a lot of different options. But more than anything I’ve learned that it’s not Disneyland, it’s not for everyone.”

Spoiler alert for the jet set:

“If you want five-star dining and room service, this isn’t it,” Moss said. “If you want come to as you are, walk in the door of any restaurant, this is it. No reservations needed. Wear what you slept in. Whatever. That’s the plus of it.”

Moss also believes in truth in advertising, being realistic and thinking holistic.

“Let’s talk about the Morro Bay experience, everything about it: parking, cleanliness, customer service, food, all of it. I listened to someone at a city council meeting the other day and he said, ‘Why do you have all this crap on the street. Are you having a yard sale every weekend?’ And I thought, you know, he’s making a very good point. If you just come here for the first time, is that your initial feeling about the community?

“We need to be aware of all of that. Signs for events after the event that are still hanging on the side of the fence… all of it. We kind of take it for granted.”

Drawing New People

While Moss is happy as a clam she landed by the ocean in Morro Bay, she remains somewhat surprised and perplexed it took so long to find her way. After all, Moss, an avid reader and traveler, has lived in California, both Northern and Southern, for a long time, and yet, she said, “I had never been to Morro Bay, and I didn’t know how to get here, or why should I come here.

“So I’m somebody who doesn’t take anything for granted. Let’s go to square number one: Why do I not know about Morro Bay?

“We haven’t done a good enough job of placing it in people’s mentality as an option. I found a lot of people had a very sentimental journey about Morro Bay. They came here for family reunions, someone in their family got married here. When I did a promotion in the Central Valley, many people said, ‘oh that’s our romantic getaway.’ So they have a good feeling about it, but as far as drawing new people here, does it pass the ‘so what’ test?

“That’s my biggest question: Why here?”

Moss recalled a conversation she had with a couple who came into the Visitors Center on New Year’s Eve. “They said they were here in Morro Bay for the evening, and I said, ‘oh, what made you spend the evening in Morro Bay?’ And they said, ‘because we don’t want to party, we don’t want the nightlife, we want a quiet, pleasant evening.’ Makes perfect sense.”

Moss talks about “the theater of the mind… What imagery is conjured up when you say Morro Bay?”

“I don’t think we’ve made our case well enough,” she said. “While I think the Rock is an interesting backdrop, I don’t think that’s the selling point. People come here, they may take a spin around it, get some fish and chips to go. There’s so much more. If I were king, if I could write those big checks, I’d be marketing Morro Bay as ‘come as you are’. That’s been my experience here.

“There’s some great little merchants here, I’ve had some great dining experiences, but I’ve learned what’s available to me. When you say Santa Cruz people know what they’re going to experience. Monterey, they know. I don’t think they know Cayucos. That was a big surprise to me, but that’s had a lot of press recently in Sunset magazine. It was selected as one of the greatest little beach towns. So now you know it’s going to be inundated.”

Moss believes Morro Bay needs to better answer the simple question, “What’s unique about Morro Bay?” And, to compete, the message has to be compelling enough to draw new people.

“Forget the people that came here in the ’50s and ’60s. If you’re coming here today, what are you going to get? It’s not just the economy. People want more for the money. They want to supersize their vacation. They don’t to make any mistakes. That’s why so many of these reservations are made online; they’re reading TripAdvisor.”

Moss believes that the number of big-draw events in Morro Bay could be improved “radically.”

”For the consumer all the information they need is online. But we need some galvanizing things to get some new people to town. Some of the existing events could be better events, and we should develop some new ones, some unique niche-marketing type of things” Moss said. “That’s where it’s at for us.”

Moss Marketing

Moss has had her own marketing company on and off for years. First it was In Any Event, which was specifically event oriented; then Moss Marketing, which branched out with non-profits, grant writing and fundraising; and now Moss Marketing Group. “Because, through my association with Morro Bay,” she said, “I’ve connected with some really talented freelancers, and those freelancers are now part of my team. So you can hire me or you can hire a social media person, a photographer, a graphics person. I bill myself as one-stop shopping. I’ve been so impressed by the level of expertise that I’ve met here.”

With Morro Bay as her base of operations, Moss is scouting regional clients, and having worked in the Central Valley before, she also hopes to pick up clients there. She is enthused about the people she’s talking to and the projects she’s working on, and convinced she can market clients regionally, statewide, nationally and globally from Morro Bay.

Moss has that inherent ability to take care of business and make things happen wherever she is, and it seems to come naturally to her.

Born in Chicago into an entertainment business family, Moss forged her promotion/marketing chops in the upstart L.A. music business of the ’60s and ’70s when she worked directly with some of the legendary executives, producers and artists that created and shaped classic rock music, such as Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, Eagles, Joni Mitchell and Jackson Browne, and industry titans Ahmet Ertegun, David Geffen and Jerry Wexler.

“I got in the business, I was maybe 21 years old,” she explained. “There were only two questions: Is the album on the charts? Did the concert sell out? That’s it. Nothing else mattered. What you wore to the office, what you said to the boss, what your hair looked like; it didn’t matter if you even came in at 9 o’clock in the morning. If you delivered, that was it. I like that.

“Nothing makes me more uncomfortable than sitting around with a group of people after an event that was a bomb and they blew a lot of money and say, ‘but it was great for a feel-good event, it was good for community relations.’ That’s not good enough to me. I like the bottom line.”

Moss’s experience, professionalism, and many successes for an impressive array of clients from rock stars to racetracks, governors to the Dale Earnhardt Foundation have established her as a fearless creative executive who is well versed in the art of the deal.

New Horizons

Moss sees a bright future for Morro Bay. “There’s change on the horizon. I think people see the need for change. It’s people recognizing it and rolling up their sleeves. I’m impressed with things like Morro Bay in Bloom and Morro Bay Beautiful, citizen groups, the Merchants Association, the Tourism Bureau, they’re all trying to do something positive.

“The hardest thing for Morro Bay is everybody is not on the same page. Getting the town on the same page is difficult. If we’re talking about tourism; there are a lot of different types of properties. So the concern of a hotelier in North Morro Bay is not going to be the same thing with the more upscale hotel right in the heart of town.”

Of course, while there will always be different points of view, pulling the town together wouldn’t be such a bad thing, either. It’s a possibility, Moss believes.

“The bottom line is all the same, isn’t it? It’s pretty simple. We want people to come here, we want them to like the town, spend their money; we want them to have a good experience. But we have to recognize that people coming here are not necessarily having a good experience.

“They may have had a good hotel stay, but they may not have had a clean street. They may not have found the merchandise they were seeking. They may not have found the menu they’re seeking. But that’s true everywhere.  It’s not that it’s only in Morro Bay. Every hospitality organization has these same problems. Working more closely with regional entities, where they can combine those dollars and have greater spending will be a good thing.

“I read these articles about the livability of San Luis Obispo, and it is. We have to take the enthusiasm we have for the community and let other people know it in a way that’s believable, that has a brand promise. We’re not the greatest coastal city in the United States. We have our own quirkiness.

“I like the quirkiness of it,” Moss said. “It’s not for everybody, but for those that want this kind of laid-back experience you can’t do any better.”